Alex Centrella is an award-winning photographer who grew up in California. He started photographing at a early age and continued to explore the art in years to come. While pursuing a Professional Degree in Photography he studied every element of photography in every course that was available. After college he continued to learn and develop his own technique and style of photography and settled on journalism and scenic photography as his primary subjects. He continued to use manual style film-based equipment for several years. Later, with the advent of the digital camera, he was drawn to the ability to combine his technological background with his art.
Alex Centrella strongly believes in photography, not only as a fine art form, but more importantly as a method of communication.
Alex Centrella continues to work and live in California.
Member of : NATIONAL PRESS ASSOCIATION

Parcial List of Clients :

San Francisco Giants, Sunset Magazine, Gottschalks, Sonic Restaurants, , Bride And Groom Magazine, Bike World, Budwieser, Starbucks, Intel, Atari, Central Valley Wine Growers, Car Parts America, jut to name a few..

BOOK REVIEW ABOUT ALEX'S NEW BOOK , ONE MAN SHOWING


Photography is personal. Perhaps the most difficult personal choices a photographer faces arise in deciding which images to include in an exhibit, particularly when his or her body of work is both extensive and excellent, as is Alex Centrella's. Listening to Alex ruminate as this book evolved (his second in a series), I alternately felt compassion for the enormity of the task and a mix of admiration and envy - I wish I had this problem.

Photography is collegial. I met Alex at a vintage motorcycle exhibition, a swank Concours d'Elegance held on the manicured lawns of the Ritz Carlton hotel in Half Moon Bay, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Usually the first thing I notice is what equipment is hanging on a colleague's neck - how much, how big - then the outfit and most important, because I am a relative beginner, what pictures he's taking. Alex didn't quite fit the stereotype I'd developed. To the contrary, he carried only one camera, a modest-sized lens, was well dressed, and he wasn't shooting a lot, not nearly as much as I. A nod and a smile led to a conversation and an exchange of cards. Since then I have gained an appreciation for his art and learned from his generously dispensed wisdom.

Photography is revealing. Though Alex has been creating images since he was twelve, made a good living from them and won a spate of awards along the way, the photographs he's selected for One Man Showing, are a not a resume but a snapshot of his mind and personality. What will they tell you about Alex, what will they tell you about yourself?

Bob Stokstad

Berkeley, California